Affordable Housing, Community Development, Reports and Publications

The High Cost of Energy Inefficiency

Energy Efficiency for All / American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE)
 

According to a new report - Lifting the High Energy Burdens in America’s Largest Cities: How Energy Efficiency Can Improve Low-Income and Underserved Communities – low-income, black, Latino and renter households all experience disproportionately greater energy burdens (i.e., the percentage of income spent on home energy bills).

More specifically:

  • Families earning the median income spent 3.5 percent of their income on utilities.
  • The median low-income household spent 7.2 percent of their income on utilities.
  • Black families spent 5.4 percent of their income on utilities.
  • Latino families spent 4.1 percent of their income on utilities.
  • Renter households spent 4 percent of their income on utilities.
     

Low-income, black, Latino and renter households typically live in older homes and apartments with appliances that are not energy efficient. This leads to more expensive utility bills that make it more difficult to climb out of impoverished circumstances. It also increases the likelihood of health problems that result from poorly heated or cooled homes.

Click here to view the full report. 

 
 

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